We Go Together – Sperm quality & overall health

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If only there were a male equivalent of a menstrual cycle. Bear with us here… Menstrual cycles serve as an invaluable window into the overall health of women. That “time of the month” informs women that their hormones are in balance, and provides insight regarding bone health, thyroid function, healthy weight maintenance and more. When Aunt Flo doesn’t come to town, women know something’s up and can dig around to find out what’s going on.

Well, to date men aren’t menstruating. But, hope is not yet lost. Recently, The National Institutes of Health (NIH) declared they will be funding research into fertility as an indicator for overall health. This news is exciting, as the outcome could be incredibly invaluable for the future health of men. Until we know more, we deem it wise to take advantage of the tools we do have in front of us, which is sperm analysis.

Although not quite as informative, or painful, as menstrual cycles are for women, men can get a better look at their overall health by having a sperm analysis. A study conducted by Stanford University Medical Center notes that “as approximately 15% of the male human genome is involved in reproduction, it is conceivable that other health ailments may also be linked to defects in fertility”. Men’s reproductive health specialist, Dr. Paul Turek, states that “when a man is systemically ill, fertility is the first thing to go” and that semen analysis serves as a “male biomarker” or medical sign to other issues at hand.

Abnormalities found in semen through the sperm analysis are linked with comorbidity and mortality rates. For instance, in 2015 men with a very low or no sperm counts had 48% higher rates of heart disease and were 30% more likely to have diabetes. Also, men with the most extreme fertility issues were linked to developing kidney disease and alcohol abuse. The study done by Stanford University states that “men with diseases of the circulatory, genitourinary, skin and endocrine systems had higher rates of abnormal semen parameters”. A lower sperm count may also signify certain cancers, such as prostate or testicular. In addition, Stanford University’s study found that “men with two or more abnormalities in their semen were more than twice as likely to die over a roughly eight-year period as men who had normal semen”.

Therefore, having a sperm analysis is an opportunity to test not only for fertility, but can also serve to inform and positively impact overall health for men. The sperm analysis performed by our lab tests parameters affecting fertility, the four main ones being volume, count, motility, and morphology. To read more about sperm analysis, you can check out our previous post here.

By using our home kit, you can start the process right from your own home with no pressure, no uncomfortable visits to the clinic surrounded by strangers. Once our lab receives your sperm freezing kit, necessary tests are performed and you’ll be notified of your results which you can discuss with your doctor. By getting a sperm analysis with Sppare.me, you’ll be choosing a safe, reliable and easy method to get an insight into your overall health.

Resources

Grants [dot] nih [dot] gov : Grants, article
Women to women [dot] com : Reverse teh curse benefits of your period, article
Washington post [dot] com : Not pregnant, sometimes it’s the man, article
Ferstert [dot] org : Relationship between semen production and medical comorbidity, article
Webmd [dot] com : Infertile men and heart disease, diabetes risk, article
Stanford [dot] edu : Infertile men have a higher risk of heart disease diabetes, article
Stanford [dot] edu : Male infertility linked to mortality in study, article

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